Tamiya 1/48 King Tiger

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Tamiya’s 1/48 King Tiger is nice little kit with a surprising amount of detail for a model that is quite a bit smaller than the usual 1/35 kits I build. I didn’t have a specific plan when I started it, other than I wanted to build it pretty much out of the box and pretty heavily weathered.

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The kit has the early Porsche turret and although the cover picture shows it with Zimmerit, no Zimmerit is included.  I was fine with this – the weather I had in mind was going to be better without it.

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The hull is die cast, which is nice and gives it a lot of weight.  Parts attached directly to the hull needed to be superglued but the upper hull attaches with screws.  It all went together easily, without fit issues.IMG_3194.jpg

My plan was to have very heavy chipping on the tank, so with that in mind I started by painting everything in a dark red steel colour:

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I sprayed a MIG chipping fluid over this, then as soon as it had dried I sprayed a red primer (Rotbraun):

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Once the primer had dried, I rubbed it carefully with water in select areas to  chip it away, exposing the steel.  I had a follower on instagram comment that this primer would never chip away and that it’s unrealistic, but I’ve found a few photos of tanks where the primer has done exactly that.

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Using Panzer Putty, I masked out an outline for the next colour, dunkelgelb Aus 44 DGIII.  Once masked, I sprayed the chipping fluid again, followed by the paint:

 

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I then chipped the this the same way as the primer:

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Once more, I masked, sprayed the chipping fluid followed by a coat of  Resedagrun with a few drops of the previous Dunkelgelb. This final layer was also then chipped.

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Tracks went on, followed by decals.  The tracks were weathered with oil paints:IMG_3288.jpgIMG_3293.jpg

I used a selection of oil paints, including some of the new Mig Oilbrushers’ – where where pretty good. I first used them as a general filter to help tie the camo together, then applied more specific rust and grime streaks. Rust was applied more liberally on the horizontal surfaces:

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Finally, I finished everything up using Mig Pigments:

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A couple of detail touch-ups and I’m very happy with the final result:

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